Subscribe via E-mail

Your email:

Follow Us

Current News

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

University dedicates Willison Hall, holds ribbon cutting for Robert C. Wiley Armory

 

On Saturday, Sept. 29, Waynesburg University formally dedicated the Willison Residence Hall and held a ribbon cutting ceremony for its Robert C. Wiley Armory. Members of the Waynesburg University Board of Trustees; President Timothy R. Thyreen; Waynesburg University Board Chair Mark Fox; the Rev. Dr. Donald P. Wilson, Interim Director of Christian Life at Waynesburg University, and additional members of the Waynesburg University administration participated in the events.

Timothy R. Thyreen, Waynesburg University President, discussed the day's significance before introducing Mark Fox, Chair of the Waynesburg University Board of Trustees, to share the story behind the naming of the residence hall.

 MG 2483 1In August of 2010, just three months prior to his passing in November of 2010, James Kenneth Willison Jr. gifted $1 million to Waynesburg University, and asked that a building be named in honor and memory of his father and mother, J. Kenneth and Wynona Shearer Willison.

“His tangible gift memorializes his parents and perpetuates the Christian mission of Waynesburg University,” Fox said.

Appropriately, the scripture verse on the Willison Residence Hall plaque is taken from Exodus 20:12, “Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long in the land that the Lord your God is giving you."

The Rev. Dr. Donald P. Wilson briefly spoke about the Willison family and his personal honor of serving as J. K. Willison Jr.'s pastor for three years before his passing.

 MG 2533 1"I chose a verse that aptly describes Jim and his family," he said. "Romans 1:16 says, "For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes. . ."

Reverend Wilson delivered the closing prayer and said, "this building will stand witness to God's love and the good news of Jesus Christ."

Members of the Willison family, including granddaughters of J. Kenneth Willison Sr. Julia Young and Amy Mendicino, were in attendance.

"We are honored to see the legacy that was begun in the early part of the 20th century continued and memorialized in this fashion," said Julia Young

Mendicino talked about the ways her grandparents made a difference to those around them.

"They showed the community they were Christians," she said. "From the squirrels my grandfather cared for to those who needed Christ, and Nana in her quiet ways; they were role models for others in their spiritual Christian walk."

ribbon cuttingFollowing the Willison Residence Hall dedication, the University held the ribbon cutting for the Robert C. Wiley Armory.

The University recently gave new life to the 98-year-old structure, making it the third oldest building on Waynesburg’s historic campus. Anchoring Waynesburg’s campus are two buildings older than Robert C. Wiley Armory -  Miller and Hanna Halls, both of which are buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, built in 1851 and 1874, respectively.

Located near the University’s Willison Hall and the Fitness Center, the Armory is a natural extension of the campus.

Like Miller and Hanna before it, the Armory was renovated to be utilized while still maintaining the historic nature of the structure. By purchasing and renovating the Armory, the University ensured the building, which has been an important part of the local community for decades, didn't fall into disrepair and disuse, Barnhart said.

The gymnasium within the Armory was renovated and became home to the University wrestling program. The Student Health Center, previously located in a house on the corner of Morris and First Streets, relocated to the Armory, along with offices of the University's Information Technology Department, while its data center remains in the Paul R. Stewart Science Hall.

The interior was refurbished, the flooring was painted and refinished and the drill hall received a significant facelift as well, with the suspended ceiling removed to expose the original domed ceiling underneath.

The ribbon cutting ceremony was followed by an open house which afforded members of the community the opportunity to examine the renovations.

# # #

Contact: Pam Cunningham, Director of News & Publications
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu

University to host residence hall dedication, Robert C. Wiley Armory ribbon cutting ceremony

 

WU ArmoryOn Saturday, Sept. 29, Waynesburg University will formally dedicate the Willison Residence Hall and hold a ribbon cutting ceremony for its Robert C. Wiley Armory. Waynesburg University faculty, staff, students and members of the local community are cordially invited to attend the events.

The dedication of Willison Hall, located on the corner of Washington and Franklin streets, will take place at 11 a.m. The ribbon cutting ceremony for the Robert C. Wiley Armory, located on Washington Street, will take place at approximately 11:20 a.m. (immediately following the residence hall dedication) and will be followed by an Open House. Members of the campus and local communities will be able to tour the facility until 1 p.m.

Willison Residence Hall

Willison Residence Hall houses 140 students in 70 rooms located among six floors. A private bathroom and an independent climate control option are located within each room. The building is also equipped with two elevators. Additional space for a sofa and a micro-fridge is available in the rooms which measure 20 feet by 20 feet.

The Robert C. Wiley Armory

A familiar name to the history of Greene County, Robert C. Wiley was a Waynesburg University (then College) alumnus who enlisted in the Army during World War II while still a student of higher education.

Buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia and posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation’s second highest award for valor, Wiley led his company into battle on August 13, 1944, near St. Lo, France, where he was killed by a German sniper.

According to the official citation awarding him with the Distinguished Service Cross, Wiley pulled his company together on August 3, after they had become disorganized after hours of fierce fighting. Though he had suffered a painful wound to his cheek from small arms fire, Wiley “refused to be evacuated and personally led his company into a strongly employed enemy position and succeeded in capturing the objective," the citation reads. 

Less than a week later, during a firefight in which most of Wiley's officers were either killed or wounded, Wiley himself was “severely wounded” in the leg from machine gun fire. Despite the injury, Wiley “brilliantly directed the actions of this company and personally led it forward 800 yards under heavy mortar and automatic weapons fire until he was killed by sniper fire.”

According to the order, “Captain Wiley's gallant leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 28th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.”

To honor him, Greene County named its local Armory, a historic structure built in 1914 residing at the intersection of Washington and Strawberry streets in Waynesburg, the Captain Robert C. Wiley Armory. Modern day demands of the community and the Pennsylvania National Guard Company B, 1-110th Infantry Battalion unit recently grew too large for the squat, red brick building. So when Company B decided to move to a larger, newer facility in Evergreen Technology Park located in nearby Franklin Township, Waynesburg University expressed interest in purchasing and updating the Armory.

The University recently gave new life to the 98-year-old structure, making it the third oldest building on Waynesburg’s historic campus. Anchoring Waynesburg’s campus are two buildings older than Robert C. Wiley Armory -  Miller and Hanna Halls, both of which are buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, built in 1851 and 1874, respectively.

Located near the University’s Willison Hall and the Fitness Center, the Armory seems an almost natural extension of the campus, said Roy Barnhart, the University’s senior vice president for finance and administration.

Like Miller and Hanna before it, the Armory was renovated to be utilized while still maintaining the historic nature of the structure. By purchasing and renovating the Armory, the University ensured the building, which has been an important part of the local community for decades, didn't fall into disrepair and disuse, Barnhart said.

The gymnasium within the Armory was renovated and became home to the University wrestling program. The Student Health Center, previously located in a house on the corner of Morris and First Streets, relocated to the Armory, along with offices of the University's Information Technology Department, while its data center remains in the Paul R. Stewart Science Hall.

The interior was refurbished, the flooring was painted and refinished and the drill hall received a significant facelift as well, with the suspended ceiling removed to expose the original domed ceiling underneath.

The basement level was gutted, Barnhart said, in order to accommodate the new infirmary. Electrical and plumbing upgrades throughout the building were also completed. The look of the exterior remains virtually unchanged except for improvements necessary for handicap accessibility. Other work included re-pointing the brick, upgrading the box gutters and repairing the soffit and fascia.

# # #

Contact: Pam Cunningham, Director of News & Publications
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu

Waynesburg University offers new Energy Management MBA Option

 

Waynesburg University Southpointe CampusBeginning this fall, Waynesburg University will offer an Energy Management Concentration through its reputable Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program.

Due to the development of the Marcellus and Utica shales in the area, the energy industry, which includes a broad range of jobs across many sectors, will continue to experience steady growth for the foreseeable future, both regionally and nationally. To better prepare students for jobs in the industry, Waynesburg has developed strategic curriculum utilizing experts and professionals already established in the field.

request-information-about-this-program

In addition to the core MBA classes which include Organizational Behavior, International Business, Management Information Systems, Marketing Management, Seminar in Applied Economics, Accounting Concepts and Applications, Financial Management, Statistical Methods, and Management Policy, students pursuing the Energy Management Option will take Energy Management & Strategy, Supply Chain Management and Project Management, specialized courses that will effectively prepare students for related and applicable careers.

The new Energy Management course will include concepts related to coal, oil, gas and renewable energy. The Project Management course will cover project management concepts, financial risk analysis, developing a project timeline, resource management, and managing outside contractors and vendors. The Supply Chain Management course will include sustainability and the use of sustainable purchases, logics, inventory management and control, global supply, and e-commerce and vendor controls.

“The Energy Management Concentration was developed with experts in the energy field who expounded on the need for qualified employees to have an understanding of all energy sources - gas, coal, oil, water and renewable energy,” said Janice Crile, director of Waynesburg University’s MBA Program.

According to Crile, relevant curriculum translates into job opportunities for students in a competitive job market. Furthermore, Crile said that with the Pittsburgh region at the forefront of the new energy frontier, Waynesburg’s Energy Management Option will give students a necessary advantage in the field.

Dr. George Smith, General Manager of Value Chain at CONSOL Energy; Dr. Jeanna Cooper, Manager of E-Services at CONSOL Energy; and Dr. Darryl Husenits, Vice President of Material and Supply Chain Management at CONSOL Energy, were among the experts who took part in the planning and implementation of Waynesburg University’s new curriculum.

“The Energy Management Option offered by Waynesburg University fills a void in higher education, as it will provide students with a broad view of the energy sector and will help students to make decisions that will add value to their employers,” Husenits said.

According to Husenits, whether an individual’s interest is manufacturing, non-manufacturing or the energy sector – energy will have an impact.

“The focus of this program is to deliver value to students by covering strategic industry drivers such as safety, compliance (internal and external), continuous improvement and risk analysis. This concentration will also provide practical application processes in Project Management as well as Supply Chain Management,” Husenits said.

Students interested in the Energy Management Option will be able to begin elective courses at Waynesburg University’s Southpointe campus during the Fall II Session offered October 22 through December 15. Students interested in beginning the Option prior to the start of the Fall II Session are able to do so by taking required core courses necessary for completion of the MBA degree at any Waynesburg University campus.

According to Dave Mariner, dean of Graduate Studies at Waynesburg University, students can expect to participate in traditional academic teaching methods such as lectures, writing assignments and exams. In addition to the customary methods, Mariner said Waynesburg University’s MBA Program incorporates facilitative exercises such as group work, student presentations and simulations.

“Our goal is to have an immediate transfer of knowledge, allowing our students to apply concepts to their jobs, consequently enhancing their ability to do their jobs,” Mariner said.

Waynesburg University’s Energy Management Option equips individuals working in human resources, accounting, finance, marketing and other energy-related positions with general business knowledge, while also offering curriculum that further develops knowledge of the energy field.

Waynesburg University is continuously enhancing its MBA curriculum with concentrations that will help its students advance their careers.

“Our goal is always to provide the highest quality of education,” Mariner said. “Our students are immediately able to apply the content that they learn into the fields in which they work. The transfer of knowledge from the classroom to the work setting is immediate, and the reason that students choose to enroll in Waynesburg University’s MBA program.”

Smith, Cooper and Husenits partnered with Waynesburg University to develop the course specifics to meet the needs of the energy industry and feel that students who complete the Energy Management Option will gain experience in applying strategic concepts to real world energy problems and proposing solutions.

“We’ve found that traditional graduate business curricula tend to incorporate high-level theories and frequently focus on manufacturing companies and processes in their application,” Cooper said. “Such application is often disparate with the needs found in the energy industry, and so, with these courses, we’ve applied traditional theories within the context of the energy sector.”

Cooper said the unique program “provides students interested in the energy field a breadth of knowledge about the various energy sectors and exposure as to how standard business functions (supply chain management and project management) are applied outside of the traditional environments.”

request-information-about-this-program

“Additionally, the program offers students an in-depth, comprehensive understanding of the drivers behind the energy market and corporate choices and ways to effectively manage key business functions in an industry that is subject to rapid and recurring change in the areas that touch technology, capacity, and oversight,” Smith said. “Students completing this program will bring a unique and more focused approach in solving energy problems as a result of their applied, problem-based learning experiences, both in the classroom and through project work.”

Waynesburg University’s 36-credit MBA Program can be completed in two years or less. Students can set their own degree pace with an exclusive “step in – step out” class format. Courses are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. Classes meet one night per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., at four convenient locations: Southpointe, North Hills, Monroeville and Waynesburg. Saturday morning classes are offered at the Southpointe location.    

###

Contact: Pam Cunningham, Director of News & Publications
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu

University honors approximately 700 students

 

Congressman MurphyWaynesburg University held its annual commencement exercises honoring approximately 700 undergraduate and graduate students Sunday, May 13.

Congressman Timothy F. Murphy delivered the commencement address, during which he gave the graduates four tasks:  to grow their faith, to never stop learning and to develop wisdom, to always be respectful and to challenge themselves.

“I call upon you to have courage,” Murphy said. “Never be satisfied with where you are, and always dream of where you want to go. This is your challenge:  push all of us to higher and better goals.”

Captain Michelle Steimer, a 2012 graduate of the Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Claysville, Pa., represented the graduate program students.

Valedictorians   Kelsey(L) Leeann(R)Leeann Danley(pictured right), an elementary special education major from West Finley (McGuffey High School), and Kelsey Brownlee (pictured left), an accounting major and business management minor from Jackson Center (Lakeview High School), were named the valedictorians. Danley delivered the valedictory to the university.

Among the graduates were Cami Abernethy (pictured left) and Alissa Boyle (pictured center), who received special recognition for their heroic acts on February 20. The women were seriously injured when they, along with several other students and a professor, stopped to render assistance at the scene of a motor vehicle accident on Interstate 79S in Perry Township, Pa. As a result of their heroic actions and their faith and grace through recovery and rehabilitation, the women were awarded the President’s Medallion of Waynesburg University.

Presidential MedallionThe President’s Medallion of Waynesburg University may be presented by the President of the University, at the discretion of the President, to honor individuals for their special or meritorious service to the University or humanity, for distinguished life achievement(s), and/or for distinctive intellectual, cultural or social contributions.

Waynesburg University awarded the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree, the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology degree, the Master of Arts in Teaching degree, the Master of Business Administration degree, the Master of Education degree, the Master of Science in Nursing degree, the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Management and Leadership degree, the Bachelor of Science degree, the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree, the Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology degree, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and the Associate of Science in Allied Health degree.

BrobergPrior to commencement exercises, The Rev. Dr. Stuart Broberg delivered the baccalaureate address, The World Needs Integrity, to graduates and their parents. Broberg noted that individuals must integrate what they believe in their hearts with what they say and do to truly have integrity.

“Believe it, say it, do it,” Broberg said. “When these three things are in alignment, only then may you say, ‘I have integrity.’”

# # #

Contact: Pam Cunningham, Assistant Director of University Relations
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu

Broberg, Murphy receive honorary doctorates

 

Broberg, Thyreen, MurphyRev. Dr. Stuart Broberg, senior pastor of The Church of the Covenant in Washington, Pa., and Congressman Timothy F. Murphy were awarded honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees during Waynesburg University’s commencement exercises Sunday, May 13. 

The degrees were conferred upon Broberg and Murphy for the ways in which they parallel Waynesburg University’s mission of faith, learning and serving. 

Members of the Waynesburg University Board of Trustees presented the recipients and assisted with investitures.  

The following citations were read: 

Rev. Dr. Stuart Broberg 

Stuart D. Broberg, in recognition of your personal commitment to education, mentorship, faith, and charity, Waynesburg University honors you.  

A distinguished pastor, you inspire others to understand Christ’s love while helping them to grow in their faith. A passionate role model and man of God, your distinct contributions have influenced countless individuals across the country while simultaneously advancing the Kingdom of Christ. 

Your resolute vow to the ministry is apparent through your selflessness and the energy and passion exuded through your daily choices and commitments. For your unwavering ability to place God before all things, and to continuously seek and know Him, we recognize you.  

For your involvement in your own community and for your personal credo as it relates to relying wholeheartedly on God, we are pleased to acknowledge you.  

Congressman Timothy F. Murphy 

In recognition of your commitment to advance the traditional values of southwestern Pennsylvanians, Waynesburg University honors you. 

For numerous professional accomplishments including authoring legislation ending discriminatory practices to seniors on Medicare seeking mental healthcare, we commend you. 

Through your service in the U.S. Navy Reserve Medical Service Corps, and your work with wounded warriors with traumatic brain injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, you have profusely demonstrated your devotion to your calling. 

With more than three decades of experience, you have passionately advocated for meaningful reforms and increased funding for medical research including mental health issues and the expansion of the use of electronic patient records, gaining respect and appreciation from your colleagues and those you serve. 

You have established yourself as a highly regarded leader and humanitarian who strives daily to parallel Waynesburg University’s mission of a life of leadership and purpose for the glory of God.

 ###

For more information contact: Pam Cunningham, Director of University Relations
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu

Student Art Exhibition to showcase semester's best

 

Waynesburg University Art Student

The Waynesburg University  Arts Department will hold the Spring Semester Student Art Exhibition Monday, April 16 through Friday, April 27 in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery. Admission is free and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

The student art exhibition will showcase the best student work of the spring semester. The exhibit will highlight a variety of media including drawings, prints, ceramics, sculpture and an assortment of two- and three- dimensional pieces. The pieces on display are selected by the Waynesburg University art faculty. 

The Art Program at Waynesburg University exposes students to the creative process and provides them with the practical experience in using tools and techniques of the visual artist. Students develop self-awareness as they find opportunities to progress according to their own abilities.

Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, or by appointment.  

Call 724-852-3274 for more information.

# # #

Contact: Pam Cunningham, Director of News & Publications
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu


Tags: ,

Waynesburg University Nursing Program joins forces with First Lady, Dr. Biden to support veterans, military families

 
Dr. Nancy Mosser

Dr. Nancy Mosser, professor of nursing and chair and director of the Department of Nursing at Waynesburg University, was one of only 20 nursing deans nationwide invited to attend an April 11 meeting with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. 

The meeting announced a commitment from nurses across the country eager to serve our veterans and military families as well as they have served their country. In a broad, coordinated effort, more than 150 state and national nursing organizations and more than 500 nursing schools including Waynesburg University have committed to further educate our nation’s 3 million nurses so they are prepared to meet the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families.  

Led by the American Nurses Association, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the National League for Nursing, in coordination with the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense, nursing organizations and schools have committed to educating current and future nurses on how to recognize and care for veterans impacted by post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression and other combat-related issues, in ways appropriate to each nurse’s practice setting.

“Waynesburg University has been and continues to be committed to the care of our veterans and their families by educating our students with the most up-to-date information to ensure the highest quality care,” Mosser said. “Waynesburg’s Department of Nursing is devoted to educating students using best practices related to caring for all patients, but our curriculum is strategically planned to address unique and challenging situations as well.” 

Waynesburg University President Timothy R. Thyreen was pleased with Waynesburg University’s involvement in the day’s event.

"Waynesburg University's Nursing Program challenges students to be familiar with all facets of an increasingly complex health care system," Thyreen said. "Our nursing faculty work hard to make certain that our graduates are prepared to offer superior care in an array of situations."

The invisible wounds of war, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), have impacted approximately one in six of our troops returning from Afghanistan and Iraq – more than 300,000 veterans. And since 2000, more than 44,000 of those troops have suffered at least a moderate-grade traumatic brain injury. 

“Whether we’re in a hospital, a doctor’s office or a community health center, nurses are often the first people we see when we walk through the door. Because of their expertise, they are trusted to be the frontline of America’s health care system,” said First Lady Michelle Obama. “That’s why Jill and I knew we could turn to America’s nurses and nursing students to help our veterans and military families get the world-class care that they’ve earned. It’s clear from today’s announcement that the nursing community is well on its way to serving our men and women in uniform and their families.”

Veterans seeking care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system are often treated by health care professionals who have received extensive training in mental health issues. But the majority of veterans in the country seek care outside of the VA system – they usually visit their local hospital staffed by nurses and doctors in their communities.  

“Nurses are at the center of providing lifesaving care in communities across the country -- and their reach is particularly important because our veterans don't always seek care through the VA system,” said Dr. Jill Biden. “This commitment is essential to ensuring our returning service men and women receive the care they deserve.”

That is why today’s announcement was of the utmost significance for troops and their families. America’s nurses are trusted partners in providing lifesaving and life-sustaining care in nearly every community and every setting where health care is delivered. They can make a dramatic and positive impact on the long-term health of hundreds of thousands of veterans. And they are eager to understand the needs of those who have served, to recognize the warning signs of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or suicide, and to know where to send them for help.

Nursing leaders have also committed to disseminating effective models for care and to sharing the most up-to-date information on these conditions across academic and practice settings. By working to expand the body of clinical knowledge in this arena and by partnering with other health care providers and institutions, nursing leaders across the country will continue to advance high quality treatment for these conditions in every community.


 The Key Commitments Include:

American Nurses Association (ANA): Commits to reaching 3.1 million registered nurses in America by 2015 to raise awareness of PTSD, TBI and depression among veterans, military service members, and their families. The ANA is coordinating a major campaign involving more than 150 nursing organizations that will reach millions of nurses on health issues relevant to veterans and their families. Partnering organizations include the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Organization of Nurse Executives, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Psychiatric Nurses Association, American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, Association of Rehabilitation Nurses, the National League of Nurses, federal nurses of the military and public health services, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.  

Together with these partnering organizations, ANA will:

  • Educate America’s future nurses to care for our nation's veterans, service members, and their families facing post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other clinical issues;
  • Enrich nursing education to ensure that current and future nurses are educated and trained in the unique clinical challenges and best practices associated with caring for military service members, veterans, and their families;
  • Disseminate the most up-to-date information as it relates to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and psychological health conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD);
  • Grow the body of knowledge leading to improvements in health care and wellness for our military service members, veterans, and their families; and
  • Lead and advance the supportive community of nurses, institutions, and health care providers dedicated to improving the health of military service members, veterans, and their families.

learn-more-about-nursing-at-waynesburg

# # #

Contact: Pam Cunningham, Director of News & Publications
724.852.3384 or pcunning@waynesburg.edu

All Posts